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Re: Pride comes before a fall

CTC Forum - On the road - 31 July 2015 - 6:18pm
thirdcrank wrote:The comments of other posters deterred me from watching this vid.
In short: it's the sort of thing a high court judge would describe as an unedifying spectacle. You haven't missed much.

Re: Pride comes before a fall

CTC Forum - On the road - 31 July 2015 - 6:16pm
thirdcrank wrote:The comments of other posters deterred me from watching this vid.
Shame.
Put some Benny Hill music on, start the video and start watching from about 3.20. That'll give you some insights into Karma, the usefulness of helmets by pedestrians and a warm fuzzy feeling that slapstick isn't dead...

Re: Mark Beaumont

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 31 July 2015 - 6:03pm
It's the dentists you really need to watch out for...

Re: Which maps for Britanny?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 31 July 2015 - 5:45pm
simonineaston wrote:Michelin maps show the campsites they recommendOnly the sites that wre in their guide the year the map was published. So probably about 5% of the available sites.

I use very minor roads and like to know just where I am. Hence I favour IGN TOP100 maps. They are 1:100,000 (close to the old Bartholomew's half inch maps we old ones remember) which means I can use forest tracks and all sorts. Index sheet here http://www.themapshop.co.uk/images/Fran ... 20100k.jpg

Re: Which maps for Britanny?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 31 July 2015 - 5:31pm
I'd need a bit more info. from you before I commit, like how far you're going and what you need to see on the map. For example, Michelin maps show the campsites they recommend, which will be of no interest to you if you're staying in chambres d'ote or hotels. I'm off to Gourarec where I will be doing 'star tours', and then going up to Paimpol for the music festival, so I'm taking the IGN Top 100 #114, which covers everywhere I'm going on this trip - lucky me!
Others will recommend smaller scale maps - the Michelin 'local' maps at 1:150k are popular.

Which maps for Britanny?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 31 July 2015 - 4:44pm
I'll be setting off for a short tour of Britanny in a couple of weeks time. I'm wondering which map to buy. I'm considering the Michelin and the AA road maps. Any recommendations would be much appreciated.

Thank you.

Re: Leeds Liverpool Canel - Shipley to Gargrave

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 31 July 2015 - 4:44pm
Bicycler wrote:+1 My hybrid (35mm tyres) and I nearly took several swims between Foulridge (on the Lancs/Yorks border) and Skipton in 2012.
I was on 700x35 Marathons, nowhere near knobbly enough for liquid mud. I'd been slithering around all the way from Gargrave to Skipton so I decided to continue on the road after I'd called at Tesco, but by the time I came out of the shop I'd forgotten my decision and got back on the canal. I'd just decided to get off again at the first opportunity when I slipped.

Re: Leeds Liverpool Canel - Shipley to Gargrave

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 31 July 2015 - 4:28pm
axel_knutt wrote:colin54 wrote:Don't know what it's like beyond Skipton.

Very muddy in 2011 when I slipped and came off. Fortunately I ended up in the bushes instead of the canal.
+1 My hybrid (35mm tyres) and I nearly took several swims between Foulridge (on the Lancs/Yorks border) and Skipton on a rainy day in 2012. It's mostly just grass and mud surface. The most poorly surfaced (but splendidly remote) part of the whole canal. I can't recall the specific Gargrave-Skipton other than that the nicely surfaced towpath through Skipton doesn't extend much beyond the town limits. Once into Yorkshire there are more swing bridges crossing the canal on the level and fewer traditional canal bridges over the canal narrowing the towpath.

Re: Land's End to Stonehenge

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 31 July 2015 - 4:22pm
From Taunton, I would go: Glastonbury, Shepton Mallet, Frome, Warminster, Chitterne, Shrewton, cycle through Shrewton towards Larkhill / Durrington until you come to the junction for the right turn to Stonehenge. (I've done this route numerous times as it's the way home for me from the SW)

Re: Free bicycle touring eBooks

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 31 July 2015 - 3:55pm
Enjoyed, as always, fantastic photos and great journalism - thanks!

Re: Pedestrians' view of bells ?

CTC Forum - On the road - 31 July 2015 - 3:54pm
mjr wrote:Bicycler wrote:I often wonder why many object to allowing cyclists to use sections of pavements, paths through parks, public footpaths etc. Then I hear cyclists say that people ought to walk in die straight lines or single file, shouldn't wear headphones, or walk dogs etc. etc.
I think that's exaggerating. I think if a path is mixed-use, then everyone should share. For people walking, that basically amounts to looking up occasionally and not walking 10m abreast. For people cycling, it means giving others at least 1.5m of space if you can, else ringing your bell well ahead and slowing to a speed that you could stop safely from, passing behind people as much as possible and basically not treating others how bad motorists treat us on the carriageway.
Yes there's some exaggeration. As we all know cyclists are not all the same and neither are their attitudes. FWIW I agree with your summary of the roles of different groups. Whilst 10m abreast walking is obviously inappropriate, we can't say to two people walking side by side on typical UK 2-3m wide shared use paths.

mjr wrote:Shared use of existing pedestrian paths is...

Ah, now, that's a key word: "existing". That's rarely a good option. However, where a path is built or rebuilt as mixed-use, especially if it's funded by cycling budgets, then I think it can be OK
It is a key word and I used it deliberately. Unfortunately former pedestrian paths seem to make up the majority of routes open to cyclists at the present time. We sometimes talk about mixed use paths as if they were ever thus. Often it's just that a few signs have been placed and now pedestrians are expected to behave differently. I keep harking back to it but the problem is often inadequate width for the level of pedestrian and/or cycle use which creates conflict. If the path is wide enough and flows not too high it becomes a non-issue. But I do think that when using such inadequate shared formerly pedestrian-only paths that we need to be accepting of ordinary pedestrian behaviour such as dog walking and headphone wearing. It would be damaging to the prospect of opening more such paths to cyclists (and I'd rather they were open than not) if permitting cycles becomes associated with greater inconvenience to pedestrians. The situation is obviously different where a new multi-use route is opened, there is no existing group to be inconvenienced. Upgraded paths can probably fall into either category. A re-laying of tarmac for the accommodation of cycles does little to change the status quo. A widened good quality path might facilitate convenient use by both groups. Ideally I'd want paths with high numbers of cyclists, for example advertised cycle routes, to be segregated rather than shared use.

Re: Pride comes before a fall

CTC Forum - On the road - 31 July 2015 - 3:52pm
thirdcrank wrote:bovlomov wrote: ... A beatific smile (like a member of a religious cult) works best for me - they can interpret it how they like.

Just watch out! The aggro might be a diversion by some cunning spook to get a look at your face. Probably best to remain totally inscrutable.

Now I think about it, the beatific smile might not show beneath the false beard. They'll just see the mad eyes.

It's only right that bicycling should be considered an indicator of domestic extremism. Why do you think the cyclist didn't take the video to the police? He feared they might see it - as all right thinking folk would - as a salt-of-the-earth motorist being set upon by an anarcho-cyclist.

Re: Pride comes before a fall

CTC Forum - On the road - 31 July 2015 - 3:51pm
flat tyre wrote:Looks to me as if the whole confrontation could have been avoided by the cyclist moving into the gap between the parked cars to let the car overtake safely, rather then blocking him off for the rest of the street.

Specifically recommended against doing this in the various cycling training manuals isn't it? I know in cars they say not to hop between parked cars, but take the lane and stay there as its less dangerous.

Either way this could have been completely avoided if the driver hadn't driven like a prat. The victim was a bit silly chasing him down, but having done the same myself in the heat of the moment it's understandable. Also remember that the camera will make this look further away than it was as the lens angle will distort the image.

Mark Beaumont

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 31 July 2015 - 3:46pm
I loved his article in Cycle magazine but wondered how he could be sure there were no hungry lions among the elephants and giraffes on his route. I don't like being chased by dogs. Lions would put me right off.

Re: Horses: modern ones selected from what stock?

CTC Forum - On the road - 31 July 2015 - 3:21pm
Tacascarow wrote:MartinC wrote:Tacascarow wrote:That has little to do with consideration & nearly everything to do with lack of experience.
I've nearly been taken out by caravans, boat trailers, general car trailers, car transporters & horse boxes.
A separate test to tow a trailer over a certain size & weight should be mandatory IMHO.

Yebbut, not bothering to learn how to do it safely is a lack of consideration in itself. Besides some of the conversations I've had indicate that some of them at least don't consider a too close pass as anything that they need to bother about.
I was merely pointing out that horse boxes aren't unique. But you are right not learning how a trailer of any sort behaves is inconsiderate.
In my part of the world caravans & boat trailers are more common than horse boxes & their owners probably don't take them on the road as often as many horse riders.

One advantage horse riders have over cyclists is their sheer presence & the fact many drivers are justly scared to go to close or fast.
More than one driver has been killed because a horse has reared & come down through the windscreen.
I can't remember any incident where a driver has been killed when involved with a cyclist.Few drivers are actually as scared as they should be when it comes to going too close. They tend to estimate a horse's width as far less than it is, rather as they sometimes do with bikes.

The usual scenario in a horse/vehicle impact is a dead or injured horse and a damaged vehicle. Riders are usually the next in line, with drivers and passengers only rarely getting injured. Like a cyclist, a horse is actually pretty vulnerable, as although it is big, something like a broken shoulder which wouldn't be fatal to a human is 100% fatal for horses, unfortunately, and despite incredible modern medical advances, even a broken leg can't always be fixed for a horse, and if not, that's a 'fatal' too.

Re: Pedestrians' view of bells ?

CTC Forum - On the road - 31 July 2015 - 2:51pm
Bicycler wrote:I often wonder why many object to allowing cyclists to use sections of pavements, paths through parks, public footpaths etc. Then I hear cyclists say that people ought to walk in die straight lines or single file, shouldn't wear headphones, or walk dogs etc. etc.
I think that's exaggerating. I think if a path is mixed-use, then everyone should share. For people walking, that basically amounts to looking up occasionally and not walking 10m abreast. For people cycling, it means giving others at least 1.5m of space if you can, else ringing your bell well ahead and slowing to a speed that you could stop safely from, passing behind people as much as possible and basically not treating others how bad motorists treat us on the carriageway.

Shared use of existing pedestrian paths is...

Ah, now, that's a key word: "existing". That's rarely a good option. However, where a path is built or rebuilt as mixed-use, especially if it's funded by cycling budgets, then I think it can be OK, but:

The key to creating space for cycling is not the regimentation of pedestrians but the reallocation of space

I'll drink to that! Is it Friday already?

Re: Transcontiental Race 2015 anyone following this?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 31 July 2015 - 2:41pm
The two time previous winner (Kristof Allegaert) is not riding the Transcontinental this year because he's riding the Moscow-Vladivostok stage race, following the route of the Trans-Siberian Railway. Total length 9195 km with 15 stages of up to 1382 km. Supported, with following cars. Web page here with live tracker, pictures, latest news etc.
They are currently about 40% of the way through the 1380 km stage 12.
Stage 4 (945km) 28 kph / 33 hours 45 minutes time limit on it. It's not clear whether this applies to all stages.

Re: Is the entire field of view blocked for an HGV?

CTC Forum - On the road - 31 July 2015 - 2:28pm
It's been suggested that this is caused, to some extent, by €U safety regs., and I can believe this to be the case.

We seem to have standardisation across Europe of vehicles but no standardisation of road conditions. Trucks which are OK in countries where they are not allowed anywhere near people are often not OK playing dodgems, or rather bumper cars, in the narrow urban streets of the UK

Re: Pedestrians' view of bells ?

CTC Forum - On the road - 31 July 2015 - 2:24pm
John Holiday wrote:Have Dutch type 'ding/dong' bells on most of my cycles , & almost always get a positive reaction from people that I pass.
They seem to be effective at up to 50 m.range, but obviously fail to penetrate to walkers using headphones!
The Sustrans mantra of 'Share with Care' comes to mind!
I often wonder why many object to allowing cyclists to use sections of pavements, paths through parks, public footpaths etc. Then I hear cyclists say that people ought to walk in die straight lines or single file, shouldn't wear headphones, or walk dogs etc. etc.

Shared use of existing pedestrian paths is at best a stop gap or a partial solution appropriate in limited circumstances. As a main focus of cycle policy - as it effectively seems to be in the UK - it takes us down a path of confrontation and mutual inconvenience. The key to creating space for cycling is not the regimentation of pedestrians but the reallocation of space

Re: Pride comes before a fall

CTC Forum - On the road - 31 July 2015 - 2:19pm
bovlomov wrote: ... A beatific smile (like a member of a religious cult) works best for me - they can interpret it how they like.

Just watch out! The aggro might be a diversion by some cunning spook to get a look at your face. Probably best to remain totally inscrutable.
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