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Updated: 2 hours 12 min ago

Re: Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

8 May 2015 - 8:49am
Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

This seems to work both ways.
I apparently startled a 'lady' pedestrian yesterday after cycling towards her for some distance wearing hiviz.
She seemed oblivious to the fact the she was walking on a cycle path and took umbridge that I was there
almost stationary so tried to shove me off as she walked past.
There would have been plenty of room if she and her partner had walked in file but abreast just no room and giving way to
an almost stationary bike seemed too much.
She wasn't even very burly.

Hey ho.

Mountain bikers take aid to Nepal victims

7 May 2015 - 6:30pm
Although technically cargo bikes it's certainly off road.
We can go places land rovers fear.

Re: What's wrong with the Schwalbe Marathon Plus MTB?

7 May 2015 - 3:38pm
Yep, it's an urban myth that they slide. They do sound like rice krispies though...

Re: What's wrong with the Schwalbe Marathon Plus MTB?

7 May 2015 - 1:15pm
Riding them on tarmac or any solid surface would be lethal as the metal studs will slide. They will also wear out very quickly.

I've found that in the four years that I've been using studded tyres I've not noticed them sliding on tarmac, let a lone being lethal. Yes, the studs will wear but not stupidly fast.

Re: What's wrong with the Schwalbe Marathon Plus MTB?

7 May 2015 - 1:13pm
Mattyfez wrote:Spike tyres are designed for riding on ice for extra bite.

Riding them on tarmac or any solid surface would be lethal as the metal studs will slide.

It isn't and they don't. Or, at least, there isn't any tarmac in Leeds which is even close to smooth enough that the studs slide on it. Noisy and slow, yes, but not lethal in my experience of a regular short journey through two winters.

Re: What's wrong with the Schwalbe Marathon Plus MTB?

7 May 2015 - 12:15pm
Spike tyres are designed for riding on ice for extra bite.

Riding them on tarmac or any solid surface would be lethal as the metal studs will slide. They will also wear out very quickly.

With schwalbe, you have 'big block' tyres like the hans damph and magic Mary which are more mud tyres, intermediate tyres like rocket ron and racing ralph for less weight, more cross country general purpose, which have smaller blocks and then slicks like the marathon etc.

Tread pattern really is a matter of what terrain you mainly ride.

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

6 May 2015 - 6:43pm
reohn2 wrote:deliquium wrote:reohn2 wrote:you being a Leghorn

I had to look that one up Only the English could bastardise the easily pronouncable Italian town of Livorno into Leghorn
I dithered when typing that
It's a term of endearment,meaning small(light) chicken.
Sorry if I caused offence.

Following your usually dependable and respected advice reohn2, I've ordered a pair of Schwalbe Landcruisers 26" x 1.9 and see if I can take to this riding off road thing - as long as there's no mud and my bike doesn't get dirty And my eyes don't rattle in their sockets
Don't blame me if you're bike gets mucky,there shouldn't be too much eye rattling with those tyres

Absolutely ZERO offence - just never heard the term and then discovered it was yet another beautiful language story

£20 for 2 tyres that are regularly recommended - and may well change my perception of riding - on road TO then being able to enjoy the tracks away from traffic? I'm happy - and usually late to the party

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

6 May 2015 - 6:00pm
deliquium wrote:reohn2 wrote:you being a Leghorn

I had to look that one up Only the English could bastardise the easily pronouncable Italian town of Livorno into Leghorn
I dithered when typing that
It's a term of endearment,meaning small(light) chicken.
Sorry if I caused offence.

Following your usually dependable and respected advice reohn2, I've ordered a pair of Schwalbe Landcruisers 26" x 1.9 and see if I can take to this riding off road thing - as long as there's no mud and my bike doesn't get dirty And my eyes don't rattle in their sockets
Don't blame me if you're bike gets mucky,there shouldn't be too much eye rattling with those tyres

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

6 May 2015 - 11:31am
reohn2 wrote:you being a Leghorn

I had to look that one up Only the English could bastardise the easily pronouncable Italian town of Livorno into Leghorn

Following your usually dependable and respected advice reohn2, I've ordered a pair of Schwalbe Landcruisers 26" x 1.9 and see if I can take to this riding off road thing - as long as there's no mud and my bike doesn't get dirty And my eyes don't rattle in their sockets

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

6 May 2015 - 10:26am
deliquium wrote:reohn2 wrote:
It's a nice trail .
What TP's do you have in the Rando's?

For road use approximately 40 front and 45 and a bit rear........

Forgot to answer this bit,you being a Leghorn and not much over 10st I think you could reduce the front by 3 to 5psi.
Landcruisers are a good off/on road tyre,the centre unbroken tread makes for good progress on tarmac and the side knobs help on rutted tracks.A larger volume one,559x47 or 50mm will increase comfort without much loss in tarmac speed with even lower PSI than the Rando's.

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

6 May 2015 - 8:05am
Merry_Wanderer wrote:I ride on green lanes, bridleways and the like, including some singletrack on a Surly Disc Trucker with 1.75" wide tyres and drop handlebars. It is a much better bike on and off road than my old mtb

What tyres do you use?

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

5 May 2015 - 10:53pm
I ride on green lanes, bridleways and the like, including some singletrack on a Surly Disc Trucker with 1.75" wide tyres and drop handlebars. It is a much better bike on and off road than my old mtb

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

4 May 2015 - 1:52am
I knew someone with a Blueridge! Blue and orange IIRC. I loved the MTB colour schemes of that era and Raleigh really did some of the boldest. All too boring these days. We're in a world of blacks, whites, silvers and 500 shades of grey and all the worse for it.

Glad to hear you've found a new type of cycling to enjoy

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

3 May 2015 - 1:01am
deliquium wrote:I didn't realise one could do an off road track from Joe Brown's to Llyn Ogwen - MUST investigate, cos the A5 trunk road is OFNADWY!
Yep,just follow the road 'till you run out of tarmac

I know and love the lanes from Bethesda to Llanberis - but prefer to avoid the traffic strewn Llanberis Pass and take the longer minor lanes via Ceunant and Waun Fawr back home
Agreed!
I just love the that road from Waun Fawr

You'll have to come over, be kind, and show me how to ride off tarmac John?
We'll definitely have to get together for a ride when I'm over your way,hopefully in the not too distant,not so sure I can teach you anything though,you looked pretty capable to me last time we met

NO I am NOT ever going to have disc brakes or suspension forks - BY THE WAY
I don't blame you about the suspension forks,but the discs are really good off road 'apparatus'

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

2 May 2015 - 9:19pm
Bicycler wrote:People went mountain biking before suspension.

People went down bridleways and canal paths on road bikes, before mountain bikes came along.

How far back do you wanna go with this?

If you put a 32/36h wheelset on and something like 25c Marathon Plus (that have an all purpose tread) I can't see why going down trails would be that bad, you'd just have to learn how to handle skinny tyres on a trail. Handling will be harder but damaging the bike or being bumped around, I wouldn't be too worried about.

My only concern would be the wheels not having enough spokes, mine are only 20/24h, but why are the potholes along canal paths and trails any worse than English roads anyway - they aren't! There's potholes not even 100M from my house that will just bend the rear wheel if you went over it too fast. On my street there's a grid running parallel to the kerb as well. I have never in my life seen anything that dangerous on a canal path or bridleway! Yet there it is right on my street.

Some parts of the UK's roads are just ridiculous. Like riding over a load of 1cm cubes or something, except the cubes are stuck there... they call it "tarmac" lol. All peeling away in layers.

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

2 May 2015 - 7:20pm
reohn2 wrote:
It's a nice trail .
What TP's do you have in the Rando's?

For road use approximately 40 front and 45 and a bit rear

reohn2 wrote:There's also a nice trail from Capel Curig(accessed past the car park by Joe Browns shop)parallel with the A5 to Llyn Ogwen then the small lane to Bethesda,then over to Llanberis and back up the pass

I didn't realise one could do an off road track from Joe Brown's to Llyn Ogwen - MUST investigate, cos the A5 trunk road is OFNADWY!

I know and love the lanes from Bethesda to Llanberis - but prefer to avoid the traffic strewn Llanberis Pass and take the longer minor lanes via Ceunant and Waun Fawr back home

You'll have to come over, be kind, and show me how to ride off tarmac John?

NO I am NOT ever going to have disc brakes or suspension forks - BY THE WAY

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

2 May 2015 - 5:31pm
deliquium wrote:
Thanks Bicycler for resurrecting/updating this post. Having been a tarmac only rider since 1957 or thereabouts (apart from a brief dismal attempt at owning and riding an Orange Clockwork across muddy rutted Wiltshire bridleways in the 1990s), I discovered yesterday a shared use hardpack trail Lôn Gwyfrai from Rhy Ddu down to Beddgelert, which I rode on a 1987 Raleigh Avanti 531 ex mountain bike frame, now revamped into the 'Summer' shopping bike LINK. This was on 26" x 1.5" Vittoria Randonneur Pro road tyres.

I loved it!. It's only 3.5 miles of tarmac road away before I'm "off road" and can't wait to explore more of the Beddgelert forest NON-TECHNICAL hardpack trails.

But the tyres were a bit non grippy on some of the steeper gritty parts, so I'm thinking of buying Schwalbe Land Cruisers, which are available for £20 a pair and building back up the 1990 Raleigh Blueridge 531 frame and forks that I tired to sell and couldn't* into a gentle easy forest track pootler.

Should I go for the 1.75" or the 2.1" and is there any reason these shouldn't be suitable? There's clearance on the frame and I won't be fitting mudguards. I don't want to go fast I won't ride through mud

* viewtopic.php?f=32&t=95709

It's a nice trail .
What TP's do you have in the Rando's?
I've ridden it a couple of times on the Vaya/Hypers(700x38s,45fr 65r) no worries,though I do find it better to sit in and twiddle a small gear on any loose stuff.

There's also a nice trail from Capel Curig(accessed past the car park by Joe Browns shop)parallel with the A5 to Llyn Ogwen then the small lane to Bethesda,then over to Llanberis and back up the pass

I was going to say you don't know how lucky you are,but I know you do

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

2 May 2015 - 12:42pm
Bicycler wrote:As the OP, some of the early posters were correct in guessing that my interests laid more in pootling off road touring than full on MTBing. For the past year or so I have been enjoying riding an old rigid Rockhopper for this purpose which has been great fun.

I thank all the posters for their responses and I particularly like some of the more adventurous pictures

Thanks Bicycler for resurrecting/updating this post. Having been a tarmac only rider since 1957 or thereabouts (apart from a brief dismal attempt at owning and riding an Orange Clockwork across muddy rutted Wiltshire bridleways in the 1990s), I discovered yesterday a shared use hardpack trail Lôn Gwyfrai from Rhy Ddu down to Beddgelert, which I rode on a 1987 Raleigh Avanti 531 ex mountain bike frame, now revamped into the 'Summer' shopping bike LINK. This was on 26" x 1.5" Vittoria Randonneur Pro road tyres.

I loved it!. It's only 3.5 miles of tarmac road away before I'm "off road" and can't wait to explore more of the Beddgelert forest NON-TECHNICAL hardpack trails.

But the tyres were a bit non grippy on some of the steeper gritty parts, so I'm thinking of buying Schwalbe Land Cruisers, which are available for £20 a pair and building back up the 1990 Raleigh Blueridge 531 frame and forks that I tired to sell and couldn't* into a gentle easy forest track pootler.

Should I go for the 1.75" or the 2.1" and is there any reason these shouldn't be suitable? There's clearance on the frame and I won't be fitting mudguards. I don't want to go fast I won't ride through mud

* viewtopic.php?f=32&t=95709

26th April 2015 ride to Grange-over-Sands and Winster

30 April 2015 - 11:41pm
Dandelions on the tarmac bridleway to Sampool Bridge by simeonorme, on Flickr

You can see rest of photos of 26th April ride to Grange-over-Sands and Winster at this link http://www.southlakesgroup.org/april-2015/26th.html

Re: Simeon's ride photo galleries

30 April 2015 - 11:29pm
A lunch time view by simeonorme, on Flickr

You can see rest photos of 19th April ride to Bannisdale and Grayrigg at this linkhttp://www.southlakesgroup.org/april-2015/19th.html

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